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  • Kenneth Hickling | St Mark's Graveyard

    Kenneth Rushton Hic kling KENNETH RUSHTON HICKLING LAC RAF.VR d. 8 October 1942 aged 22 657400 ​ Baptism: 17 Jul 1915 St Leonard, Padiham, Lancashire, England Sydney Hickling - [Child] of William Towell Hickling & Rose Born: 22 May 1915 Abode: 6 King's Avenue, Haslingden Occupation: Assistant Works Manager ​ Marriage: 28 Jul 1914 St Leonard, Padiham, Lancashire, England William Towell Hickling - 26, Secretary, Bachelor, 2 Park Road, Padiham Rose Rushton - 24, Spinster, 5 Blackburn Road, Padiham Groom's Father: William Henry Hickling, Retired Police Sergeant KENNETH RUSHTON HICKLING joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve as a Cadet Officer. He had lived at Hazelhurst Cottage, 2 Hazelhurst Road, Worsley, and had been a pupil of Eccles Grammar School. He was the son of William Towell Hickling and Rose (née Rushton) Hickling, of Worsley. Kenneth had been born in Blackpool in the first quarter of 1920. His parents were married on 28 July 1914 at St.Leonard's, Padiham. Kenneth had an older brother, Sydney, born the 22 May 1917, also in Padiham. It appears that he played Lacrosse for Worsley. In his will, administered on 20 January 1943, he left his estate to his father, a dyer. His body was interred at St.Mark's on 13 October 1942. LAC Hickling died at RAF Hospital Rauceby, a hospital housing a crash and burns unit, and specialising in reconstructive plastic surgery, under the wing of RAF Cranwell. His death was registered at Sleaford, Lincolnshire. He is buried in the churchyard in a family grave. ​ Researched and written by Paul R Speakman Back

  • Q to Z | St Mark's Graveyard

    Private Graves Q-Z RASBOTHAM Peter REISS Reginald RIDYARD Family RAWLINSON Grace REW David RILEY Francis REEKS Kent REYNOLDS John ROGERSON Elizabeth ROSCOE James SALT Thomas SCHUSTER Louis ROYLE Emily SCHOLFIELD Annie SCOTT William ROYLE Jonathan SCHUSTER Family SEDDON Peter SHAW Joshua SHARPLES Samuel SHEARMAN Family SIMISTER Charles SHARPLES Ellen SMITH Elizabeth SMITH Jeremiah STANNING Richard Capt. STONES Thomas TEALE Family SMITH William STEELE Albert STUTTARD James TEMPERLEY George SPAFFORD Family STONE Thomas SUMMONS Stephen TEMPERLEY George T TEMPERLEY Robert TOOTAL Edward TYLDESLEY John T UPJOHN William TENNANT Thomas TUNNER James TYLDESLEY John WADDINGTON Ellen THOMAS Sarah TYLDESLEY George E TYLDESLEY Joseph WALKER John WALLWORK Thomas WHITEHEAD Thomas WILLIAMS Richard Hall WILSON Thomas YATES John WARD John WHITTLE Sarah WILLIS Robert WILSON William WHITEHEAD Jane WILD Samuel WILLINK Francis YATES Job Home

  • Norman Lingard | St Mark's Graveyard

    Norman Arthur Lingard NORMAN ARTHUR LINGARD Sgt. RAF.VR d. 28 March 1942 aged 27 1059599 NORMAN ARTHUR LINGARD was born in the first quarter of 1915. He was the son of Arthur and Betsy Lingard (née Beckett), of Worsley, who married in the middle of 1912. A memorial in the United Reformed Church on Worsley Road bears his name, together with five others who died in World War II. He was buried at St.Mark's on 1 April 1942. Norman Arthur Lingard was flying a Lancaster (serial number R5501, coded EM-G) when it collided with a Miles Master (DK973) during a daylight cross-country exercise. Both aircraft crashed at 1320 hrs on Canwick Hill, just to the east of Bracebridge Heath, 2 miles South of Lincoln. The crew of four, all members of 207 Squadron, were all killed: Sgt. N. A. Lingard; Sgt. D. A. Wood; Sgt. R. W. Cox; and Sgt. T. C. Massey. The pilot of the Miles Master, Lt. J. D. Linaker was also killed. The following account of the incident is recorded in chapter 5 of the book On the Wings of the Morning by Vincent Holyoak. This is a copy of the relevant chapter. For six weeks that it was stood down, 207 was busily engaged in converting on to the Lancaster. By the end of April, it could boast sixteen of the new type on strength with as many trained crews. In the meantime, the seemingly interminable circuits, night landings and cross-countries were not without their drama, with two aircraft being destroyed. The first and most tragic loss was that of 27-year-old Mancunian Sergeant Norman Lingard and his crew in Lancaster R5501 EM-G. Just after lunch on March 28, they were engaged in a daylight cross-country exercise south of Lincoln when Cranwell based Miles Master DK793 flown by a pupil pilot, Lieutenant Linaker, began to carry out a series of unauthorized feint attacks. Unauthorized aerobatics of any kind were expressly forbidden. Many a trainee had been killed showing off, and on one pass witnesses on the ground saw the Master slice into R5501’s tail section, both aircraft spinning out of control to crash on the Bracebridge Road. Lingard and fellow Sergeants Wood, Cox and Massey, along with the Master pilot were all killed instantly. Norman Lingard had already survived many operations as a second pilot and to die in such a way was particularly sad. Researched and written by Paul R Speakman Back

  • People | St Mark's Graveyard

    People connected to St Mark's Church 1st Earl of Ellesmere Rev William H Baynes Bio Rev G C Dickinson Bio Rev H R Hopwood Bio Rev Charles Lowe Bio Rev A W Sillitoe Bio Rev John H Watmough Bio R. Froude Coules Bio 2nd Earl of Ellesmere Rev J B Cater Bio Rev Robert Harland Bio Rev B W Johnstone Bio Rev A W McLaren Bio Rev H J Smale Bio Rev F J Wrottesley Bio 3rd Earl of Ellesmere Rev T H Davies Bio Rev W G Harland Bio Rev H D Knatchbull Bio Rev Thomas A Morley Bio Rev Charles Spencer Bio Joan Pomfret Bio Home

  • James Allen | St Mark's Graveyard

    JAMES ERIC ALLEN JAMES ERIC ALLEN Fg.Off. RAF.VR d. 7 December 1941 aged 28 106109 JAMES ERIC ALLEN was the son of William Henry and Sarah Agnes Allen (née Aston), his second wife, of Monton Green. He was born on 14 March 1913As a school boy, he attended Eccles Grammar School. He married Vera Margaret Gaskell in the early part of 1940 (Barton district). On 14 April 1941, R.A.F. Wellesbourne Mountford opened, 4 miles east of Stratford-upon-Avon, which became home to No. 22 Operational Training Unit RAF , flying Vickers Wellingtons and Avro Ansons for RAF Bomber Command . It was part of R.A.F. No.6 Group Bomber Command and remained an O.T.U. over the next four years, its purpose being to train British and Commonwealth aircrews, (pilots, navigators, bomb aimers, wireless operators and air gunners) day and night, and have them ready to move on to operational squadrons. As 22 O.T.U. grew in size, sadly the loss of aircraft and personnel rose accordingly. In total, some 90 aircraft were destroyed, with 80 airmen injured and 299 killed. Of these, 244 were Canadians. James Eric Allen came to Wellesbourne as a member of No.12 course, training to be a pilot on Wellingtons. Each course taught the basic skills over an eight-week period. Because of the intensity of the course, accidents started to occur more frequently. One such accident, typical of dozens that were to befall Wellesbourne, occurred on 7th December 1941. It was a Sunday evening and the Midlands was suddenly engulfed in severe snowstorms. Two aircraft were carrying out circuits and landings. At 1830 hours, Wellington T2566 of 'B’ Flight was on finals, approaching runway 24 when the pupil pilot, P/O J. Lynas, aged nineteen, completely lost visual sight of the runway lights. He dramatically lost height and hit a row of trees in line with the flarepath. The aircraft burnt out in the ensuing crash by Heath Spinney on the Newbold road, killing P/O Lynas, P/Instructor Turner and WO/AG Sgt. Chancellor, and badly burning P/O Jackson and AG Sgt. Lane. Five minutes later, Wellington X9625 of 'A’ Flight was unable to line up with the runway due to the snow and, in trying to overshoot, caught the trees on Loxley Hill, finally crashing into the top of Red Hill, near Woodfield farm, quite close to the station wireless building. All four of the crew initially survived the crash, but sadly P/O J. E. Allen and W/O A. D. Cuthbert RCAF died later of their injuries. The other crew members were Sgt. J. H. Cox and AG Sgt. Allen. The death of James Eric was recorded in Stratford-upon-Avon in December 1941. His will, which was proved on 2 February 1942, shows that he lived at 'Berwyn', 1 Larch Avenue, Swinton. He had died on 7 December 1941 at Ettingley Farm, Loxley, Warwickshire. His estate was left to his wife, Vera Margaret. His name appears on the War Memorial Board from Eccles Grammar School which was re-dedicated in its new home in St. Paul's Church, Monton, at 10.45 on Remembrance Sunday, 13th November 2005 Researched and written by Paul R Speakman Back

  • I to P | St Mark's Graveyard

    Private Graves I-P JOHNSON Thomas KNOTT James KEEVNEY Peter LAMBE John KERR Margaret LANSDALE Robert LAWTON John LEIGH William LLOYD Lucy MABERLY Charles MARTIN William LAYCOCK John LEVERSON-GOWER Francis LOFTHOUSE Zuleika MAKIN John McCAIRN Elizabeth LEATHERBARROW Enoch LLOYD Abraham LOWE Hannah MARSHALL Rev. Peter McCREA Edward MILNER Cpl James MIDGLEY Thomas MULLINEUX James MIDWOOD Norah MIDDLETON THOMAS MOORE Mary MOORE Thomas MURRAY Ebie NIGHTINGALE Peter OMMANNEY Annie PHILLIPS George MORRIS William MURRAY John Rigby NODEN Emily PARTINGTON James PROUD Robert MOUNTCASTLE William NEILD Henry NORRIS Ellen PEARCE James Home

  • Thomas Yates | St Mark's Graveyard

    Thomas Yates THOMAS YATES Gunner Royal Field Artillery 'A' Battery, 64th Brigade d. 23 January 1919 aged 26 25058 Thomas was the son of James and Mary Alice Yates, born on 15 November 1892 and baptised at St. Mark's by A. W. McLaren on 15 December 1892. His father was a blacksmith and their abode was Berry Fields. In the 1911 census, they lived quite simply at 237 Kempnough. James was still a blacksmith and Thomas, now 18, was a gardener. He had 2 sisters and 1 brother. Thomas was buried in the churchyard on 27 January 1919 by the Rev. H. W. Thorne. His address was 249 Kempnough. He had fought somewhere in France and was granted the 1915 Trio of medals. WORSLEY GUNNER'S DEATH The funeral took place at the Worsley Parish Church, on Monday, of ex-Gunner Thomas Yates, who, after serving three years and eight months with the R.F.A. died at his home yesterday week. Deceased was the youngest son of Mr. James Yates, 249 kempnough, Worsley, and enlisted on Sept. 3rd 1914. For over two years he was on active service in France, and prior to receiving his discharge in May of last year, was in hospital for 11 months, having been badly wounded in the left leg. Since leaving the Army he had worked for the London and North Western Railway Co. On various occasions he had been under medical treatment, and since last October had been an outpatient at the Manchester Infirmary. He was taken ill last Monday week, and on the Wednesday morning was removed by ambulance to the Infirmary. He returned home at night and it was seen that his condition was worse. He lost consciousness on the Thursday morning and died in the afternoon. Ex-Gunner Yates was 26 years of age and well known in Worsley. He was associated with the Sunday School, a former member of the church choir, and a bellringer at the church. Numerous letters of sympathy have been received by the family and many wreaths were sent by friends. His elder brother, William Yates, has been in Salonika for two years with the R.A.M.C. and is expected home shortly. The two brothers last met in November, 1914. [Local newspaper] Beneath his name on the family headstone is the inscription HE HAS FOUGHT THE GOOD F IGHT. Researched and written by Paul R Speakman Back

  • Herbert Toft | St Mark's Graveyard

    Herbert Toft HERBERT TOFT Lt. 7th East Lancs. Regiment 16906; 3rd Royal Warwicks. Regiment; 821 Sq. RAF 12 October 1918 aged 22 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Much of what is known about Herbert Toft comes from three newspaper reports about him published before and after his death. ​ MONTON OFFICER ACCIDENTALLY KILLED The death has taken place at Lincoln, as the result of a flying accident, of Lieut. Herbert Toft, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, attached to the Royal Air Force, and second son of Mr. and Mrs. William Toft, 16 Pine Grove, Monton. Lieut. Toft, who was a flying instructor, was in the air as pilot with a pupil on Saturday, when something went wrong with the plane, and the machine nose-dived to earth. He was killed instantly, although his companion escaped almost uninjured. The sad end has created deep regret among a large circle of friends. Lieut. Toft was only 22 years of age, having joined the army in November 1914, before he had reached the military age. He enlisted in the East Lancashire Regiment as a private, and in May of the following year crossed to France. He was given his commission abroad in November 1916, being gazetted to the Royal Warwicks. He took past in much of the fighting last year, and on May 4th was wounded at Bullecourt, his services on that day being recognised by mention in Sir Douglas Haig's despatches. On recovering in this country from the wounds he became attached to the Royal Air Force, and in June last year was given his wings. His progress in the new branch of warfare he had entered upon gained for him the appointment of instructor, which, as stated, has ended in his untimely death. He was educated at the Monton Day School, under Mr. Tyson, and before the war was an engineering apprentice at Messrs. Nasmyth, Wilson and Co., Patricroft. He was a playing member of Monton Lacrosse Club, and a patrol leader in the 2nd Worsley troop of Boy Scouts. The funeral took place on Wednesday afternoon at Worsley Church, a service having previously been held at the Baptist Church, Parrin lane. Several of his fellow officers from Lincoln were present, and a firing party from Heaton Park attended and paid the last military salute. The Boy Scouts were also represented. Lieut. Toft's elder brother, Lieut. Walter Toft is in the Manchester regiment. He enlisted as a private in the Royal Scots in 1914. [Local newspaper] A second article speaks with pride of the commissions given to the two local brothers. MONTON BROTHER OFFICERS Two Monton brothers who enlisted in the Army as privates have recently been granted commissions. They are Walter and Herbert Toft, sons of Mr. and Mrs. W. Toft, 16 Pine Grove, Monton. Both enlisted in November 1914. Walter joined the Royal Scots, and after six month's training in Edinburgh, he went with his regiment to the Dardanelles. He landed in Gallipoli in June 1915, and then took part in several stiff engagements with the Turks. After the evacuation of Gallipoli he went to Egypt and returned to England in August 1916, and after passing through the Cadet School at Newmarket, was gazetted second-lieutenant in the Manchester Territorial Reserve Battalion, and is now with that regiment somewhere in France. Herbert enlisted in the East Lancashire Regiment early in November 1914, and after six months' training on Salisbury Plain, went out to France. Like his brother, he has seen much fighting in different parts of the line. He had not been in France very long before he was raised to the rank of sergeant, though at the time only 19 years of age. He received his commission in November 1916, and was gazetted scond-lieutenant in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and is now in France. Both are members of the Monton Lacrosse Club, and were keen on the Boy Scout movement in their boyhood. [Local newspaper] In the 1901 census, Herbert (aged 3) was living at 90 Parrin Lane, Monton, with his family. His father was William (37), a Tobacconist and Fancy Goods Importer. His wife was Annie (40) and they had two other sons, Walter (6) and William Jnr. (3). By 1911, the family had moved to 16 Pine Grove, Monton. His father was now 48 and his mother 54. The eldest son, Walter, was 16 and at school, and Herbert was 14, an office boy in a Shipping House. William and Annie married in the last quarter of 1893, her maiden name being Dowler. In his will, Herbert was of 16 Pine Grove, Monton. He officially died at Scampton, Lincs., on 12 October 1918 - a 1st Lieutenant in the Royal Air Force. He left his effects of just over £167 to his father William, a commercial traveller. Probate was granted on 6 November. On 13 April 1918, he had been transferred to the newly formed (on 1 April 1918) Royal Air Force, 821st Squadron, 23rd Wing. He may have been born on 22 May 1896 in the Barton District. Although his family had been non-conformist, he was buried in St.Mark's Churchyard. The funeral service had been held at Winton Baptist Church, on Parrin Lane, at 2.30pm. The official church entry reads: Burial: 16 Oct 1918 St Mark, Worsley, Lancashire, England Herbert Toft - Age: 22 years Abode: Northern General Hospital, Lincoln Grave: 22 N.P. Notes: Under Burial Laws Amendment Act Buried by: S.J. Wilson To summarise the information above, Herbert first joined the 7th East Lancashire Regiment with the number 16906. After training, he was posted to France with his regiment, landing there on 18th July 1915. He quickly rose to the rank of acting Sergeant before being commissioned as a Second Lieutenant to the 3rd Royal Warwickshire Regiment on 11 November 1916. On 13 April 1918, he was transferred to the newly formed Royal Air Force, but sadly died on 12 October 1918 as a result of a flying accident whilst flying with a pupil. Researched and written by Paul R Speakman Back

  • Benjamin Gratrix | St Mark's Graveyard

    Benjamin Gratrix BENJAMIN GRATRIX Private The Loyal N. Lancashire Regt. 6th Bn. d. 12 June 1920 aged 38 13775 Benjamin Gratrix was the son of George and Alice Gratrix. In 1891, he was aged 9 and living with his parents at 15 Edge Fold as a scholar. In 1901, he was aged 19 and still living with his parents, now at 10 Edge Fold. His occupation was waggoner in a coal mine. Benjamin was baptised at St. Mark's on 31 August 1882 by William H. Baynes. His parents were married also at St. Mark's on 31 December 1870 by St. Vincent Beechey. In 1911, he was a boarder at the home of Elizabeth Pickup at 74 Harriett Street, Walkden, and was 28 years of age. It is known that Benjamin served in the Balkans and that he was entitled to the 1915 trio of medals, the 1914-15 Star; the British War Medal; the Victory Medal Researched and written by Paul R Speakman Back

  • WW1 | St Mark's Graveyard

    World War One Graves The below are casualties of World War One buried at St Mark's. Robert Ambler Evelyn Lord Fred Wilby Slinger Ross Barnes Herbert Moores Herbert Toft William Goodall William Parker Thomas Yates Benjamin Gratrix Harry Sheldon Arthur Ratcliffe Home

  • Inside | St Mark's Graveyard

    Inside St Mark's Church Worsley Click on image to expand The Chancel Reredos c1866 Pugin Glass 1851 East Window St Mark's 1882 Memorial Tomb 1st Earl of Ellesmere Egerton Crest Francis Egerton K.G. 1855 Foundation Plaque Memorial to A. F. Egerton Burne-Jones 1905 Choir Stalls Altar Frontal Altar floor Section of the Pulpit Corbel Home

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